VMware vSphere Client – Can’t Connect When Windows Firewall is Disabled on Windows 7

This probably affects other programs as well however for me it was trying to use the VMware vSphere Client to connect to a VMware vCenter server. For the life of me, I couldn’t get it to connect. The vCenter services were all started, networking looked good, I could ping the vCenter server, everything that I tried didn’t work.

After calling support, we determined that the workstation we were using was running Windows 7 and that the Windows firewall service was disabled. The support dude said that by default, Windows 7 will block all traffic when the firewall is disabled. Huh..

So the fix was to perform the following steps:
1) Enable the Windows Firewall service
2) Open up a command prompt and type: netsh advf set allp state off

That command will turn off the Windows firewall without disabling the service (so that it doesn’t block traffic). It worked great for me and the vSphere Client could now connect!

Building a Virtual Desktop Image?

Building a virtual desktop image can seem like an easy process…and it is, but if you really want to have a centrally managed image that is tweaked to provide the best user experience then you’d be wise to check out this spreadsheet and involve Lewan & Associates professional services to help you create the perfect image for your virtual or physical machines for a Windows XP or Windows 7 deployment.

http://myvirtualcloud.net/?p=414

Windows 7 “GodMode”

In case you haven’t already seen this, here’s a shameless link to CNET which describes this feature in a bit more detail.  It’s not so much a “GodMode” as it is a quick control panel link to all of the system’s control panels. 

Definitely something for you administrators who are implementing Windows 7, it would seem that you could copy this folder to a PC when you start working on it and be able to skip all the levels of control panel navigation you would normally need.  Or you could even copy this to user machines start menu via logon script, group policy, etc…it’s just a folder so the options are endless.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-13860_3-10423985-56.html